Loreto, Baja California

I love the Jacques Cousteau quote on our Evolve Freediving t-shirts, “The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in it’s net of wonder forever”.  We’re all hooked forever.

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The thought of ending our time living and cruising on Makai has Marie making extreme decisions.  She said that when we arrive in Loreto, she’s going to catch the next flight to the Bahamas.

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Until then we are enjoying the Sea of Cortez.  Whales frequently pass us quietly.  Occasionally we see their tail flukes as they disappear out of sight.  Manta rays leap out of the water and slap on the surface.  I haven’t been lucky enough to capture them in a photo yet.  We also see seals and gangs of dolphins.

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All of this activity usually gets Topaz riled up, she races around Makai barking.  Occasionally, the dolphins pause for a look at the noise maker and then go off and give her a show, leaping and slapping the water.

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The trip up to Loreto is just a little to far to make in one day so we stopped at San Marcial Pt. for a little snorkeling. The shoreline and reefs are usually steep and rocky.  Way off shore is a reef that is visible by this little rock tip with a gull perched for a rest.

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The visibility has been horrible, but today we had a beautiful dive.  Still waiting for the water to warm up.

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A spearfishing/snorkel trip can be about 2 hours long.  The chilly water has been leaving us with numb fingers and toes.  This cloud of tiny fish didn’t complain.

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The reefs are mostly boulders and walls of rock with occasional sea fan and spongy coral.

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Roy was anxious to get a little more practice with his spear gun.  In contrast to the groupers in the Bahamas that quietly hide in holes, the leopard groupers in Mexico swim out in the deeper open water and quickly sprint away from our spearfishing boy Roy.  This gives Roy plenty of exercise and practice with his deep diving. We learned that 1% of the groupers metamorphose into this golden color.

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As we were wrapping up our morning dive we started to notice the red tide moving in.  It is interesting the way it swirls around at various depth and water temperatures that it prefers. A once crystal clear anchorage is now mucky and red.

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Twenty five miles to Puerto Escondido and Loreto Fest 2015.  Along the way we have homework and fishing.  Maybe a little more fishing than homework.  The Black Skipjack / Mexican Bonito kept jumping on our line, one after another.  They are good fighters and like to dive deep, so Makai needs to come to a stop for this 15 minute battle.  One battle is ok, but after about 5 fish, Eric suggested we pull in the lines and keep going so we can get into the bay before sunset.

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Just in time for Loreto Fest.  We raced up here for this weekend event.  We were here for Loreto Fest 1998 and again 2000, back then the party was a week long. This year it is two days of pot lucks, music, seminars, meeting new friends.

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Dogs are always invited, but they have to stay in the shade.

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Mary from AirOps offered a shell drilling seminar.  She brought equipment and shells for everyone to make a necklace or earrings.  Genny brought a favorite shell to drill and now we have a new hobby.  I spend at least one day in each anchorage searching for shells.

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A local cooking school was invited to make lunch.  They had bbq hamburgers and hot dogs, tamales and tacos in the evening.  But the best was the sushi bar.  I got this beautiful plate of sushi for 100 pesos which is about $6.50.

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Puerto Escondido is now managed by a marina.  Personally, I think the marina is an asset to the bay.  We used to have nothing more than a dinghy dock, water hose, trash and a shaded meeting place available.  Now there is a dry boat storage, mini market, laundry, showers and bathrooms, trash, this cool upstairs pool, occasional internet, the taxis hang out in the parking lot and moorings are easy to pick up.

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Next to the upstairs restaurant is an unused bar with power for me to sit at and work on the blog.  Don’t get the wrong idea about the internet, it is still a grueling struggle to upload photos.  On this day I spent 4 hours uploading the La Paz photos and another 4 hours with the video of us swimming with the seals.  After 4 hours with the wifi, I was only 50% on the video upload and took it back to the boat to finish up with Eric’s Mexican Cellphone data plan.

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The Hobie is always great fun for bored kids.  Even out here on a cruising boat we all have trouble with the kids getting too much “screen time”.  Every time I turn around someone is sneaking a game.

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The evening entertainment was some amazing volunteers.  There were 3 or 4 guitar players playing songs we all know, one young guy playing concert quality classic violin, and of course we have ….

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The Mears family singers with their rendition of “Dumb Ways to Die“.  This hilarious song comes from a video game and is also a safety advertisement for an Australian public transportation system.

Whew, after all that socializing, off to the islands.  Isla Danzante is about 3 miles away. We did some great snorkeling and a few short walks.  After a day, we were driven out of there by the bees.  Apparently, they send out scouts looking for fresh water and if you don’t kill them, they bring back all their friends and the swarm is scary.

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Isla Carmen and Marquer Bay is next.  The cactus are so cool, growing wherever they find water and congregating in the lowlands.

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Happy Birthday to Eric!  We spent the day Hobie Sailing and snorkeling and now Roy, our master cake maker, set out the cake for Eric to make a wish.

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We’re racing to finish up school, which mainly consists of math. I have to say, I’m way better at Algebra now than I was in 1980.

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We don’t formally do science, geography or history on Makai, because we live it.  We’re learning about the missions which started in Loreto in the 17th century, the expedition the Spaniards went on to discover that Baja is a peninsula instead of an island in the 16th century as well as science like how to spot a Mexican Chocolate Clam.

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The science lab requires the use of a mask and snorkel.  When you see these two uniform holes close together, dig your fingers down a few inches and pull out the clam.

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The girls came ashore to die their hair.  The dollies are resting in the shade while the girls read books in a cave and let the hair dye set.

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Roy, Roy, Roy, can think of only fishing fishing fishing. Line fishing off the back, trolling on Makai and the Hobie, at the beach or on the rocks, spear fishing with a gun or Hawaiian Sling, or even using his hands as well as a hand net or throw net.  Catch and release as well as for keepers for the dinner table.

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The puffer fish was scooped up with a net for closer observation in the bucket.

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Speaking of critters, its time for kibble inventory.  We left with five bags of Canidae delivered to the Solomans, MD. Post Office from Amazon.com. Each bag lasting 2 months, we’re down to the last two.  Our quality control expert is making her final check before we split and repack the last two bags.

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Ballandra Bay is another favorite anchorage.  There is a picture of Eric sitting in the water looking out towards Loreto framed and hung at our cabin.

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Roy and I took the Hobie for a little ride to explore.  We had the bright idea to pull into a little tidal estuary and immediately got stuck in the mud. I was most worried about losing shoes in the thick mud.  This worry comes from experience at the muddy beaver ponds and river banks in Colorado.

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A closer look at the cactus gives an appreciation for their needles.

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A 20 mile trip around the top of the island takes us to Punta Perico. We scrambled around on the rocky beach looking for shells and pretty rocks.

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It’s certainly not as soft as the Bahamas beaches, but just as quiet.

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The anchorage is surrounded by rocky reefs.  On our first trip to this bay the visibility was barely 10 feet, but within a week it improve to double or triple that. Roy as always is bringing home dinner.  As compared to the Bahamas, he spends a lot more time searching and stalking big fish and then only brings home one or two instead of a whole bucket of smaller ones.

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A few miles away in the dinghy is a 100 foot long tuna boat wreck. Eric heard that it sunk in 1981 and lays in 26 feet of water on its side.

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The boat makes an impressive reef loaded with schools of huge fish.

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The wreck is covered in plant growth with scallops and crabs living in every nook and cranny.

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I’m really impressed with the number of fish we’ve seen so far in Mexico. Every time we go snorkeling the water is swarming with life.

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Wrecks are great reefs as long as they aren’t leaking harmful fluids.

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Roy’s catch of the day is a Barred Pargo.

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Nothing goes to waste.  We get two jumbo fillets, the gulls sit off the back squawking at him for the skin and then the rest of the carcass is consumed by the food chain that feeds off the bottom.

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The refrigerator is sparse, time for another grocery run. Plus, our pals on Yolo and Terrapin were in Puerto Escondido, so it’s time to go back for another visit.  In two days we managed to take care of trash, dinghy fuel, propane, laundry, groceries, dinner out and make plans to go back to the island ASAP.

On the way we had a few sprinkles so I got out and scrubbed the deck.  Just as I got everything soaped up the rain stopped.  Eric got out the hose, Yahoo, lets waste water maker water!

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Happy Marie is enjoying jumbo sized bananas.  There are some things you conserve on a boat and other things you don’t.  One the banana gets brown spots I have to get creative to get anyone to eat it, so eat them up now!

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After our last dinner out at the Tripue, Genny was ready to cook Mexican food.  Here is her enchilada creation.  I prefer to heat them in a skillet, it’s quicker and doesn’t make a stuck on mess in a casserole dish.

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Back at the wreck in Salinas  we’re going to explore on SCUBA.

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We have a real system now.  Everyone is getting used to finding and putting together their own gear.  Eric and I supervise a little and check to be sure the air is on and everything works properly.

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Then at the dive site, I get in first and collect each kid as they enter.  After we swim around a little someone gets cold or bored and switches gear with Eric to finish the dive.  A normal dive for us has a total bottom time of about 45 minutes at 25-30 feet deep using about 2000 lbs of air. Just enough to keep everyone happy, interested and in practice. While Roy like SCUBA its against the fishing regulations to kill anything while using compressed air.  So, SCUBA only holds his interest for so long.  Marie likes to SCUBA but gets cold, so her dives are short. Genny loves SCUBA the most.  She is the first one in and the last one out.

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Genny likes to look for shells and explore the dark corners of the wreck.

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SCUBA lets us get close to the fish and just sit there and watch them live their lives.

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Genny found a big snapper hooked on a broken fishing line.  She was so proud to find this fish.  It was a combination of Roy’s line fishing and spear fishing without all the hunting.

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After diving we joined our friends for a walk on land. Check out Terrapin’s Blog for more photos. Salinas was home to salt mining until the early 1980s and now hosts a big horn sheep hunting lodge. Cruisers can go ashore and ask permission to poke around in the ruins and go see the salt pond.

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The beach is quite long and very sandy compared to what we’ve seen so far in the Sea of Cortez. Jess found a stick bug, this is a new critter..

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While the lodge was modern and beautiful, we were interested in the run down ruins of the salt mine.

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The half a dozen or so buildings are nothing more than stone walls and what’s left of the roof.

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Some buildings had a sign labeling it as the office, other’s had paper records dated 1980.

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A rusted out typewriter overlooks the disintegrated remains of a dock.

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The kids found the kitchen with a sparse cupboard. Our friend, Jack, visited these ruins in the early 1990s, just ten years after it shut down. He said there were still bottles in the pharmacy and stuff like that.

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We mostly saw rusted mechanical equipment and vehicles.

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The salt marsh was cool.  It looked like snow from afar.  Up close the crystals shined in the sun.

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We walked cautiously on the salt because it looks like slippery snow.

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Roy found a bit of water inhabited by hundreds of fiddler crabs.

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Like all good Mexican towns, the church is at the center.  Our Lady of Carmen is a statue of Mary and baby Jesus encased in glass.  I think that on this trip I just came to realize all the “Our Lady of xxx” churches means that is the name given to the statue of Jesus and his mother.  In Puerto Vallarta we saw Our Lady of Guadalupe and in Buffalo we visited Our Lady of Victory, there must be thousands of “Our Lady” churches around the world.

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The beach is full of so many shells, they were used to decorate this outside wall.

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On Roy’s birthday, 14 on May 14th, we had a great family evening but saved cupcakes for when our friends arrived.  After cupcakes everyone watched a John Wayne movie.

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The dewy morning attracted bees in search of fresh water.  We’ve found that they are easy to swat and flick off the boat.  Once we get rid of them all, no more come until after the shower hose sprays water on the back deck.

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Swat Swat Swat, that’s our entertainment for the day.

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Don’t forget Topaz.  She barks to swim, barks for food, barks when you leave in the dinghy, barks at dolphins, barks at rays, barks at pangas, barks barks barks.

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But she is much better off swimming off of Makai than snorkeling.

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One last look at the reef.  Roy goes out deep looking for the big fish, but I got back in the dinghy.  We’re starting to see Portuguese Man o War float by.  Many years ago I had a bad experience with these guys and ended up with zig zag blistering welts  on my legs, face, neck, arms.  It was horrible and I hope we can get through this trip without anyone getting stung.

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We’ve spent several evenings playing cards while Roy fishes off the back.

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One after another everyone pulls in Chubs, Grunts, Jacks, Yellowtail, and anything else that jumps on the hook.  The kids have a blast fighting these little guys and then sending them back to the school.

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Making the full loop again we stopped by Danzante for one more snorkel before heading back to Puerto Escondido for another round of chores.

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One of Puerto Escondido’s landmarks is the pointy gorilla head in the Sierra Gigante Mountains.

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We all piled into Yolo’s car and took off for a day in town. The waterfront statue here is a whale shark.

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We had a meal at a bbq chicken restaurant.  You can’t beat it, a whole chickens, fabulous crispy french fries, tortillas and chips, and drinks for about $10 per family. Courtney scraped the leftover chicken scraps in a pile for the dog wandering around out front.  The dogs roam freely, most of them look like they’ve had several litters and many have some sort of healed over injury or infected looking part.  It’s sad, but all the dogs in this town look well fed.

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We went for a tour of Our Lady of Loreto.  This was the first mission in the Californias and held it’s first mass in 1697.

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I took this picture a few days before and was later surprised to notice that the statue of Our Lady of Loreto was not on display in my picture.  It is hidden behind the red curtain.

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The mission was built more than 100 years after the town was claimed by the Spaniards. Back then they thought Baja was an island but after further exploration and no northern route was found, they charted it as the peninsula of California Baja Sur.

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We browsed the adjoining museum and learned about the indigenous people, four different missionary orders, explorers, their lives and challenges on Baja.

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Roy spotted a cactus outside and told us about a scene in the “Mask of Zorro” where the bad guys stripped the good guys naked and tied their hands together around a cactus.  If one guy pulled the guy on the other side got poked by the cactus.  Wow, if I could use this technique when the kids are being bad, I bet moral would improve around here.

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Around the mission are several gift shops, restaurants, and a Thrifty Ice Cream.

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About a block away we found the tortillaria, marine hardware store, and grocery store.

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All this shopping is tiring.  The laundry is clean and the boat is prepped, tomorrow we have a guest arriving.  We used to live on our boat next to our pal Jack in San Diego.  He told us about his sailing stories about cruising in Mexico in the early 1990′s which was one of our influences for our first trips in the late 1990s.

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We will spend one last week cruising these islands (and a few new anchorages) with Jack.

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La Paz

Baja, here we are.  Mainland Mexico has great food, high end resorts, and rain forests, but the Baja has beautiful water, majestic mountains, and in the bigger towns you can get great food as well.

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Marina de La Paz does a great job hosting cruisers that anchor out.  For 15 pesos ($1) we tied up our dinghy, could fill up water jugs and put trash in their dumpster at the marina. For another $1 each we took a hot shower.  The Marina also hosts the cruisers club where we checked out movies, got a cup of coffee, exchanged books and bought t-shirts.

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All the Mexican towns we’ve visited have many interesting sculptures along the water front. Some are beautiful and other’s make you scratch your head and wonder.

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At least artists don’t have to search for a gallery, there is plenty of room along the coast.

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I’m so surprised at how many places are still in business since the 1990′s.  I totally forgot about La Fuente for Ice Cream and slushies. After walking through town I remembered the square that had the best street tacos and the hike to the supermarket.  It’s crazy how the human brain can store away a tiny little memory and have it surface when the eyes see a familiar place.

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A couple walking along the waterfront had this little puppy that attracted the attention of 6 kids.   Ohh, isn’t it so cute?

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After two days of restaurant tacos and the hike to the supermarket, we joined Yolo in search of the Mercado.  The Central Mercado is the center of activity in a Mexican town.  The building is mostly just a warehouse roof, with a few walls here and there.  Inside are rows of stalls.  Courtney, her daughter Presley, Genny, and I took a stroll through to see what the mercado had to offer.

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When we came upon the fruit juice and cup stand we had to stop to refresh ourselves before shopping.  For about $1.20 each, the ladies mixed up a blender of fresh squeezed oranges and strawberries for us and topped off our cups until the pitcher was empty.  At first I was going to pass, but I’m so glad to have had this treat.

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The stalls across the way sold fish, meat (including pig heads), and cheeses.

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In another aisle you could buy flowers.

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But we came here to fill our carts with produce. Fifteen years ago at this very stand, Becky from DC came to visit and we filled our bags with fruits before heading out to the islands. At that time we spent $15 for six big bags of produce, today it cost $30 to fill both of my rolling carts.  Maybe a little more expensive, but still a great deal.

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Wait a minute, who can come to the market without picking up a crown or communion gown, maybe a t-shirt.  We did pick up a lime squeezer at the housewares stall.

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We’ve become addicted to Carnitas.  That’s seasoned and slow roasted pork served with tortillas, salsas and a few other condiments. I usually buy a Kilo to go which will provide our family at least 3 meals with left overs for a few more days.  Using our limited Spanish we found that there is a market three blocks up and two over, or was that two up and three over.  Hmm, after asking directions at every street corner we got something like go that way for a few blocks and then go a few more in another direction.  The good news is that we found Mercado Bravo!  By now lunch snacks were in order.  Mercados can be counted on for the Best lunch stands in town.

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Back on Makai, we put away our produce, cut up the ripest and sweetest to be eaten right away and stashed the rest for tomorrow.

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The carnitas were to die for.  I would have gotten a picture of the beautiful plate of tacos we made, but they were eaten before I could get the camera out.

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One more delicacy is the Pacifico Ballena. Ballena means whale in Spanish, this chica beer is just short of a liter but there are bigger ones.  We’ll have to try those next.

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Now that our bellies and refrigerators are full it’s time to go out to the islands.  There are many beautiful anchorages to choose from, but with only a few days until we want to be in Loreto, we had to make our choices count.  This is Caleta Partida where Isla Partida and Espiritu Santo islands are separated by a small cut in the sand bar.

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Topaz enjoyed her first shore leave since the little corner of sand she played on in Paradise Village.  She loves to romp in the water and pounce on little fish.

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The Hobie got some use.  Mexico never seems to have wind coming from the right direction and intensity, but you can count on windy afternoons in the anchorage.  The Yolos and Makai’s each took the Hobie out for a spin in the afternoon breeze.  In the end we went into the warm shallow water to bask in the beauty of the desert meeting the sea.

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What a contrast from the Bahamas.  We sure do miss all of our friends but have been blessed with new ones.

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In this little bay the pelicans go crazy on the bait fish.  All around us they were dive bombing into the water after their dinner.  There were dozens of them falling out of the sky on the little fish in the bay.

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The next day everyone piled onto Makai for a short trip to the top of the island and then a one mile dinghy ride to Isla Islote to swim with the sea lions.

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While this whole area is part of the park system, Islote is also protected from fishing. When you enter the water the sergeant majors greet visitors.  This must be their job in the ocean because they do the same at every tourist snorkel spot we’ve been to.

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A couple of dozen seals lay basking and barking in the sun on the warm rocks. Occasionally one barks the wrong way at another and there’s a little scuffle.  Then the tourists get a little to close to the island and a male swims along the perimeter to warn the visitors to keep their distance.

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Their sleek bodies shoot through the water with ease.

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Habituated from all the visitors they have no problem checking us out as we check them out.

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We wore plenty of neoprene but the chilly water had the kids scurrying back to the dinghy to warm up in the sun.

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We saw all kinds of sea creatures as well.

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It was hard to concentrate on any one creature because the seals would steal the show.

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A fair number of green eels were swimming freely and sticking their heads out to see what is going on.

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Then out of the corner of my eye someone would come check me out.

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We also saw the Hawkfish which was so easy to hunt at Isabela.  We made a deal not to shoot these guys because they aren’t much of a challenge even though they did provide a delicious meaty meal.

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Back at our anchorage the Hobie sailed us around.  A dorado shot past Roy fishing on the stern, through the anchorage, and back out to deep water.  Roy was so excited that he grabbed Matt and jumped in the dinghy to troll around the anchorage.  No luck, but a nice try.

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Like most everyday, we had a blast! There was beach time, rock climbing, fishing, sailing and swimming.

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Matt and Courtney sailed the Hobie back to Caleta Partida while we brought the kids, and Roy trolled.  Fish On! always makes Roy happy.  He caught a Bonita/Skip Jack.  It’s part of the tuna family, but not very tasty, so he went back to the sea.

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Isla Isabela

Breaking free of Paradise Village was difficult.  It’s hard to leave the sweet life with a hose at the dock, flush toilets, long hot showers and the resort pools.  But there are more adventures to be had.  We had one last night in Bandaras bay at Punta de Mita before heading out early the next morning for a day at sea heading toward San Blas.

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On the way Roy caught another Sierra (Spanish Mackerel).

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Another new experience was little squid.  Every morning we would find squid here and there on Makai but the worst part is they inked when they hit the deck.  One morning I found one had somehow jumped in the window  to our bathroom and landed behind my toilet.  That’s just crazy!

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This anchorage was sought out for surf.  Eric and Matt headed toward the waves.

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Meanwhile we had girl-fest with Little Pet Shops on Makai.

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The San Blas area is our last glimpse of Mainland Mexico.  The water was murky and cold, and the no-see-ums were voracious. We had two great days with our friends on Yolo and Tarapin, but we had to get out of town to avoid the bugs.

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We make all kinds of delicious meals on Makai.  Today Roy made chocolate chip cookies and Marie made Mac and Cheese, so Eric made himself a sandwich with fresh bollios, a little mayo and (ewww) Mac and Cheese and cookies. To wash it all down we dug a cold cerveza out of the frost on the refrigerator.

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Next stop is Isla Isabela.  This little island is a 40 mile ride for us, about 15 miles directly off shore, and 90 miles from the big port of Mazatlan.  It was the home of a research station, but is now uninhabited.   A Frigate Bird and Blue Footed Boobie refuge here makes the sky an entertaining sight but the best part is clear water for the first time since Makai was in the Bahamas. Yolo, Tarapin and Makai had the place to ourselves with a few fishing pangas anchored around the reefs.

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Due to my concerns for Topaz getting sick from the cloudy mainland water, she hasn’t been able to swim off the boat for quite a few weeks.  She was happy to get back to her old routine in this beautiful water.

While Isabela is not a park or preserve, it sure does look like one.  We saw more fish here than anywhere we’ve been anywhere!

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The rocky reefs had sea fans and small patches of coral, but the number of fish was amazing.  Huge schools of several different species of fish everywhere.

I’m sorry that I don’t know the names of all the schools we saw, but I was most impressed by these little fish with a white spot near their tails.  From a distance they tricked my eyes looking like squid.  Another cool school of fish was the long skinny body of the houndfish, and then there was this awesome school of hundreds of two foot long, silver jacks.

We all took a 30 minute dinghy ride around the island.  This is one of the many places that deserves a week or more to explore but you can never get that much time because the weather is bound to change driving all the boats out of the exposed anchorage seeking shelter from the wind and waves.

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Marie spends plenty of time in her room digging though her belongings coming out with new combinations regularly.

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I went to give Topaz a haircut but the clippers weren’t working. Eric, the fixer guy, did this and that with them and then suggested I try a few hair on the back of his neck to see if they work.  Oops, they worked alright and I carved a huge swath of hair off the back of his head, better keep going.

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Marie, on the other hand, had been playing with pin curls, braids and twists.

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In Puerto Vallarta, Roy got a spear gun for his early birthday present.  He’s been anxious to try it out and Isabela is loaded with fish.  After struggling for two days to get the loading, aiming and shooting technique with this weapon, he finally figured it out.  His first fish was a hawkfish which was cheating because this guy just sat there in the rocks asking to be made into fish tacos.  We later learned that in some areas they’ve been wiped out because of how easy it is to spear them.  Oops, we won’t shoot one of these again, but it did make a great meal.

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Next Roy took the challenge of the free swimming Pompano.  The waters at Isabela are a bit deeper than we experienced in the Bahamas, but Roy has had a lot of practice and was able to toss three pompano in the bucket today. Luckily we have friends to share with because the fish is always best when cooked up the same day.

The next kid activity is a SCUBA dive.

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Eric, Roy and Marie are just getting over a horrible cold with sinus congestion being a show stopper for divers.  Marie had a bit of a struggle to clear her ears in the beginning but after getting it worked out we had a great dive. The girls did a great job sticking together and exploring.

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Since the water is a bit deeper than we’re used to, I didn’t want to take our camera down.  It’s only rated for 40 feet, not exactly a SCUBA camera, but Eric swam over the top of us taking photos from the surface.  Check out his reflection in one of our air bubbles.

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Our time in the marinas allowed quite a bit of growth on the hull and barnacles on unprotected areas like the prop shaft.

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We would have loved to stay a few more days but the Sea of Cortez in calling and the 300 mile crossing is predicted to be glassy with no wind so we better go.  In Mexico the weather conditions are either nasty wind and waves coming from the north, which we can’t use to sail north with anyway, or no wind, so we better go.

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These calm weather windows are enjoyable passages.  After several days of friends and activities, it’s nice to relax and read.

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Marie dug out her old Halloween Costumes and toys.

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Our anchor had trapped more squid on the two night passage. Now we’re in La Paz, Baja California South with Sea of Cortez adventures ahead of us.

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Paradise Village, Banderas Bay

The lack of clean clear water along the Central American coast left us longing for the resorts.  Paradise Village was the ultimate promise to the kids for water fun.  Eric, Teak and I first experienced this place in 1998 and 2000 on old Makai, then returned to visit Joan and Blair on Capricorn Cat when Roy was an infant and again later Eric and Roy returned when he was still a toddler.

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The resort is a combination of hotel rooms, time shares, and resident villas as well as the marina.  Mayan themed art is everywhere.

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The pools are fantastic.  Climb up the stairs in the tower in the center, cross the swing bridge and choose which crocodile to slide down.

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We hung out at the pool with our friends on Cat2Fold.  Ordering pool side food and drinks, playing on the slides and swimming through the tunnels and caves under the island. It’s like going on vacation with your friends, great fun.

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At the other end of the resort is another pool with the hot tub in the cave behind the water fall and more bridges and tunnels in the pool.

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This pool has a snake slide as well.

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In front of the pools are rows of palapa umbrellas and beach seats.  You can buy jewelry from vendors cruising by, how about a beach massage? maybe get your hair braided? check out surfboards, boogie boards, or paddle boards? take a parasail ride or stroll to the end of the beach and visit with Topaz.

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Topaz was quite a celebrity playing at the end of the beach.  She met all kinds of nice people who came to watch her play in the surf. One of her favorite tricks is to pounce on little fish and floating sticks and then when she got out to belly deep water she grabs her collar and brings herself back to shore.  After that she turns around and does it all again, over and over and over again.

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For all the freedom Topaz has at the beach, there are two tigers who don’t get out much. A breeding pair of Bengal Tigers have produced 3 litters accounting for 11 cubs to share with other zoos around Mexico. I’m sure these Tigers would be happier on some free range preserve, but at Paradise Village they are well fed and have good veterinary care and are safe from poachers that threaten the 7,000 Tigers still in the wild.

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A collection of parrots also live here.

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Marie and I got to watch a fun bird show and learned that all the parrots spoke Spanish except for one who is from Brazil and speaks Portuguese.  Our last visit here was before all the buildings were finished.  At that time there was a big vacant lot with Ostriches and peacocks roamed freely.

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The property also includes a mall with a laundry, food court, trinket shops, clothes stores, a few restaurants and a grocery store.  Everything is sold at tourist prices but very convenient.

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We also had access to the Hospitality suite.

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During the day, visitors whose transportation and accommodations didn’t coincide, could relax here and wait.  But in the evenings, marina visitors who are looking to enjoy the air conditioning, cable TV, hot showers, and high speed internet would congregate up here.  A half wall divides the room so the kids can relax on one side while the adults visit on the other side.

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The grounds are very clean with well kept grass and flowers along the paths that wind along the water and through the buildings.

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The waterfront in Nuevo Vallarta is now lined with resorts.  They are all beautiful, but Paradise Village offers the best facilities and includes the boaters with their top notch marina.

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Years ago when visiting here we used to trek to Jarretaderas for more reasonable grocery shopping outside the resort.  We had a bit of a late start and by the time we arrived in town, most tiendas were shutting down for the day, but it was nice to see real Mexican towns still exist outside the resort.

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Then there is the trip into Puerto Vallarta.  While the distance isn’t much more than 10 miles, the bus trip could take nearly an hour stopping at the other resorts transport workers and the few tourists like us too cheap to hire a taxi.

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One of the attractions for the cruisers here is Walmart, Sam’s Club and of course Costco. Hey, we have a Costco card, lets go.  We decided not to have lunch so we can enjoy Costco Pizza and hot dogs.  When they swiped our membership card at the food court, we found that the card was expired.  Then we found that we couldn’t renew at their membership desk because the Mexican computer system doesn’t update our cards. By now everyone is starving and I’m trying to renew online with very slow cell phone data.  Ahhhh, what a nightmare.  Finally someone at membership decided that even if I renew online, my card wouldn’t be updated for 24 – 48 hours so he decided to just give me a day pass.  What a pain.  In the end our ‘day pass’ got everyone filled up on pizza and hot dogs, frozen yogurt and churros and we spent a few hundred dollars on stuff we didn’t really need.  Ahh, life is good at Costco and a cab transported us with all our stuff back to the marina.

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Another day we joined our friends on Cat2Fold (yes it’s a catamaran you can fold up and trailer around) and Yolo (stands for You Only Live Once) for a stroll along the Malecon.  The waterfront walkway offered plenty of places to part us with our pesos.

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We have seen some great sculptures in Mexico.  There are dozens to enjoy along Puerto Vallarta’s Malecon.

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Who thinks up this stuff?

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How about this sand sculpture!  What a shame to have it blow away with the next storm.

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Now lets get to business with treats.  Genny and Georgie have mangos on a stick and Marie has a cup of watermelon.

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Meanwhile Roy spots moving statues across the way.

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Which banditos are statues and which are real?

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How about hair braids?  Marie and Georgie got their hair done while the rest of us browsed in the trinket shop.

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As with most Mexican towns, a Catholic Church is located at the city’s center.  Our Lady of Guadeloupe has been at the center of Puerto Vallarta since its construction that started in 1915 with the main project completed in the 1940s.  We visited on a week end and got to peak at many pretty ladies in gowns and men in suits waiting for a bride and groom to walk down the isle.

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Mexico has quite a few Volkswagens and many of them are classic beetles.

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After spending our money on hair braids, bathing suits, tips to the sand castle people, live statues and other street snacks we went off in search of a cheap taco restaurant.   This is difficult with so many places catering to tourists. Most of the places along the water front offer entrees for $10 – $15 each which is too rich for our budget.  Finally we found a place with tacos for about 75 cents, cheap sodas and they let us bring in beer we bought from the store across the street. Seven kids and five adults got stuffed on tacos, sodas and beer for about $45 plus a hefty $10 tip and off we went, back to the bus stop.

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Everyone was quiet on the way home with bellies full of tacos and this guy and his little buddy singing for a tip.  Yes, be sure to have small money available for tipping performers.

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Back at the resort we went to the Sunday night welcome party.  The resort provided entertainment, vendors, a few snacks and raffle drawings. Genny scored this pretty dress.

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The spa and salon had a booth there and Eric signed me up for most every treatment they have to offer.

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The dancers performed colorful native numbers, then the MC drew raffle tickets for dinners and spa treatments.  Everyone in our group gave their tickets to Genny and she won a dinner ticket for the Mexican Fiesta.  Next she traded her dinner ticket to me plus baby sitting duty for our friends on Yolo for a spa manicure and pedicure.

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What a great day for Jackie!  I started out the morning with a soak in the spa hot tub while sipping lemon water, then a  90 minute massage followed by a 90 minute facial and massage.  After all that I could barely think straight enough to do any more chores.  Later that day I enjoyed visiting with my Genny while we had our nails done.

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In the evening Eric and I went to the Mexican Fiesta with Courtney and Matt.  We were greeted with tequila shots and a poolside seat.  The buffet was fabulous, we tried to sample a little of everything but couldn’t make through all dishes before being to stuffed to go on.

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The entertainment was fantastic.  The dancers did several costume changes plus there was a guy who performed with his lariet or lasso and an 11 piece mariachi band.

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After the show a small band and singer entertained for the rest of the evening.

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The MC organized a game for people to walk a beam out over the pool for a bottle of tequila.

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The evening finale was fireworks.  It’s great to be on vacation in Paradise Village!

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Easter

Yeowch, Eric is lighting a fire under me, I’m so far behind on blog posts.  Between days at sea and days filled with chores, wanderings in town, killer margaritas and marina internet that keeps the computers squirreled away in the kids’ rooms I can’t ever seem to get myself to sit down with the blog.

Every cruiser know about ‘getting stuck’.  When you pull into a sweet place that offers all the resort amenities, easy laundry, groceries, power and water.  How about cheap restaurants and friends too, it’s nearly impossible to leave.  Eric works a bit to earn our daily expenses then we head to the pool and slides, charge a few killer margaritas to our room (slip) and head off to meet friends for dinner or a dock party.  What nut case would want to leave?

The season is wearing on and we have to get up to the beautiful waters of the Sea of Cortez, so off we go.

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The last time we were in this area we spent New Year 2000 in Tenacatita Bay.  Yep, we Partied like it was 1999.  This time we’re considerably later in the season and got to celebrate Easter in the bay.

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Genny and Marie did a fantastic job coloring eggs with sharpie markers.

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We met up with our pals on Cat2Fold for an egg hunt on Makai.  This is getting to be quite a tradition.  Our first Easter in BVI we searched for eggs with the Pimentel Family who passed this great boat on to us after their trip through the Caribbean and the Mediterranean sea. The second Easter was with the Hill family one of our oldest friends in CA, when they visited us in the Bahamas.

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We’re on slightly different schedules with Cat2Fold, so we said, “see you up the road”, as they left.

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The rest of the weekend we shared with Chris and Lorry on Hiolani. We shared many great times at this anchorage with them all those years ago and have had a wonderful visit this year.  The Hobie had great bay sails, there was a bit of surfing and beach, but between the jelly fish and red tide, we mostly wanted to stay out of the water. These are seasonal hazards that we didn’t experience on previous visits earlier in the season.

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Everyone got into the cooking. Roy made a lemon cake, Genny made lemon squares and then helped fry pinwheel snacks and the empanadas I assembled. Easter dinner was a Mexican Fiesta.

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But before dinner we took the jungle cruise.  On the way into the river mouth we smacked another rock to even out the banged up dinghy propeller by snipping off a chunk of the third blade. In the old days we would tour up this river and at the end the reward was a beautiful sandy beach lined with Palapa restaurants serving Mexican delicacies and cold beer at a prices that will keep you sampling another taco.

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On several occasions these palapas, that are actually squatters on private land, were mowed down and rebuilt until guards were posted to keep the great times away.

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The Pangas still come through and a few days later we heard Palapa restaurants opened for business once again.  We saw a few birds and crabs but even though we were told about crocodiles, we didn’t see any.

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The next day Chris and Lorry gave us all their produce for our ride north and went home to water their plants. We really had a great time with them and will miss this area.

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Makai headed north to Chemala in search of surf.  On the way there Roy dragged a line with his new the lure he made with Chris. When he went to check his line he was surprised to find a tired fish dragging through the water.  He didn’t take any line or bend the rod to indicate his desire to join the Makai crew.  We never caught a fish like this one, but the book called it a Sierra or Spanish Mackerel. Cool our pals on Dream Catcher always said it is one of their favorites.  The Sierra is in the Tuna and Wahoo family but the meat is definitely lighter and delicious on the BBQ with butter and garlic. The book also said they are plentiful and almost considered a nuisance by anglers because they are so easily caught.  We did catch another  a week later.

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The surf was fun.  Waves were small with a sandy bottom you can stand up in with bare feet.  Eric and the kids caught plenty of waves then made me catch a few, I’m more of a diver than a surfer.

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I guess when we go home I’ll be making trips to the surfing beaches.

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These great surfboards came from Costco back home.  Eric packed them in his luggage to transport them to Grenada in 2012. A few months ago, one got away and he managed to find it like a needle in a haystack.  Now, they are finally in the anchorages that Eric envisioned he would use them.  Next stop Bandaras Bay.

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Barra De Navidad

Another easy passage, two nights.  Nothing going on, we cooked, ate read, watched movies and even had a cold Pacifico. We arrived at the entrance around 4am, too dark to enter the marina.  There was absolutely no wind, Eric turned off the engine and Makai floated in place one mile off shore until after our breakfast of cherry and apple crepes.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This beautiful display reminds us that the Spanish missionaries spread the word of God throughout central and south America.  I know they spread plenty of other less desirable things here as well but at least Jesus remains important to the people here.

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Barra de Navidad was first recorded in 1535, then on Christmas Day in 1540 New Spain’s first Viceroy sailed in and crossed the sand bar, naming the port Barra de Navidad. The little port was used for a shipyard and in 1564 four ships set off to discover a route to and from the Philippine Islands.  They all arrived safely but unfortunately only one ship returned the following year.  This voyage began the 250 year trade route connecting Asia with New Spain. Barra de Navidad didn’t necessarily become a busy thriving port for traders, but has maintained a quaint small town atmosphere frequented by tourists who enjoy the beach here.

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For most of our trip we tried to avoid marinas, but the ones we’ve encountered along this coast are reasonably priced with fabulous amenities. Here the slip rate if you spend 5 nights is 70 cents a foot.  That’s less than the price of a night at a Motel 6 .  Here we enjoyed beautiful pools with slides, a swim up bar that serves killer margaritas, activities for the kids like ping pong, Foosball, and water volley ball.  The marina was clean with floating docks, free water and inexpensive power.

 

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Everything was quiet when we arrived early, but as the day wore on things picked up and the place was down right lively.  Apparently the Mexicans celebrate Semana Santos for two weeks around Easter.  Families from big cities like Guadalajara flock to the beach resorts.

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Each morning we were treated to the French Baker.  We could give him an order for the next morning or just choose from what ever was available when he came around to our dock.

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Some of our favorites were the ham and cheese croissants and berry pie.

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Roy loved the chocolate croissant.  We also sampled coconut pie, key lime pie, chocolate pie, and  jalapeno baguette.

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Eric spotted Regardless here in the marina.  Sheldon Gebb confirmed that this is a boat he once owned with a partner and did the Transpac race to Hawaii on many years ago.

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As always we keep our eyes open for critters.  This puffer fish got spooked and we watched him bob around forever trying to deflate himself.

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Beautiful, but scary to me are the jelly fish.  I’m very sensitive to things that sting in the water and one look at those long flowing tentacles keeps me dry.

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We were used to seeing iguanas in the Bahamas, but they were always in a big colony at the beach where tourist boats would come and flip them a few heads of lettuce.  Here the iguanas are all over the place living like any other lizard in you back yard.

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We met up with our old friends Chris and Lorry on Hiolani right away.  They cruised their boat down here more than 20 years ago and found a little piece of land on a canal and started building their home.  Soon after it was finished it was destroyed in an earthquake.  But hey, now they know how to build houses so they started over again. We originally met Chris and Lorry while they were visiting and working summers  in California and then again when we cruised down here in 1997 and 1999.

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Their house is beautiful decorated with plants they found while hiking in the jungles outside of town.

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They also do some amazing wood work.  They made all the cabinets, and tables, many of the chairs and decorations like these brief cases. Everything has a story.  Lorry tells about the names she’s given the animals and often includes their boat, Hiolani in the scenes.

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Just when you don’t think their wooden projects could get any better, they throw the cover off of one of their first projects, Woody, car with a wooden body.

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Many of our days in town were shared with Chris and Lorry.  The girls decorated eggs with sharpies and made the most beautiful eggs I’ve ever seen them decorate.

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It will be a shame to crack open these intricate pieces of art.

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Out in the garage the guys worked on fishing lures.

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After Topaz thoroughly searched the house and we put the dangerous things up high they way you would for a toddler, she settled in for a nap on the couch where she could keep an eye on the household activities.

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Not only are they masters with wood working, Chris is also a master marine engine mechanic by trade.

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Our new outboard engine has always been difficult to start.  After advising Eric where to lube and change oil, they developed a plan to prime the engine before starting and amazingly it now starts with the first pull.

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Thursday was market day in the streets.  Lorry took us into town to look for provisions and trinkets we just couldn’t live without.   How about a pregnant Barbie?

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How about intricate bead work from indigenous craftsmen. Well, maybe we don’t really need all that, but we did find a berry stand and loaded up with blueberries, black berries and strawberries.  I cleaned them all and everyone scarfed them up.  The leftovers were whipped into smoothies in our new blender.

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Chris and Lorry tilled, planted the soil in the vacant lot across their little street. We were treated to a tour of the garden.  There is a big sweet potato patch as well as stevia, with super sweet leaves that are processed into sugar substitute.

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They also have sunflowers that they steamed up for dinner and nasturtium, edible flowers. I was surprised that the kids tried every interesting leaf that Chris passed out to them, including the flower.

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This is a great use for a lot perpetually for sale.

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The marlin and sailfish sculpture greets visitors coming into Barra de Navidad. The sculpture is more than 5 meters high, is considered to be the largest Marlin sculpture anywhere and was placed in the Guinness Book of World records in 2011.

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Chris and Lorry seem to know everyone in town. They stopped by one shop to say hi and the owner was feeding this little baby.  She said she found five of them abandoned and had distributed them to friends for round the clock feedings.  This little guy is about 10 days old and doesn’t even have his eyes open.

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Down on the Malecon, sea wall, is the Nereida and Triton sculpture.  It was erected to commemorate the 400 anniversary of the Philippine Island voyage in 1554. While at the ice cream store we met up with Georgie and Bao who wandered around town with us the rest of the day.

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Don’t look up, we’re crossing the street.

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Marina Isla Navidad was really comfortable with slips the right size for a catamaran.

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Eric went out for a sail with Brian and his friend from back home Josh on Cat2Fold while I spent the day at the pool with all the kids.  Cat2Fold is a is a light weight catamaran with freestanding side by side masts.  Brian can fold it up and trailer the boat back to Jackson, WY for lake sailing.

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The pool was relaxing but the 4pm dock party was moving into Makai’s cockpit, so I better get home.

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Sailing friends come and go and come back again.  Our Cat2Fold friends left today but Marie quickly made friends with Nadia at the pool.

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The resort is an all inclusive if you have a wrist band and a popular destination for Canadians, Americans and Mexicans on spring break.  there are three levels of pools with slides connecting each pool and a hot tub near by.

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Between the great food and company in town and the easy life of a resort marina, it was really hard to throw off the dock lines and leave.  But two fun anchorages and another resort marina are next in our schedule.

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Zihuatanejo

Here we are!  When I was sad about leaving the Bahamas I consoled myself knowing that we would be going to Zihuatanejo, for shopping and eating.  Eric, Teak and I were here 17 years ago and spent many happy days enjoying this bay and town.

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Topaz has been dry for weeks and weeks, anchored here off of La Ropa beach she gets to swim all day.

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This beach is popular with tourists for walking, swimming, playing in the waves, taking parasail rides, renting Hobie Cats, paddle boards, kayaks, and rides on the inflatable banana through the anchorage.

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We’re also half way between town and Las Gatas beach so the Coca Cola delivery boat stopped by to see if they could sell us a few bottles.

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The other side of the bay is the town of Zihuatanejo.  The beach is lined with the panga fishing fleet and the fish market, a few restaurants and shops.

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The first order of business is shopping.  The map located the market.  We expected the central municipal market but instead we ended up at Commercial Mexicana, similar to a Walmart and not what we expected, but we did fill up our carts with groceries and had a good tour of town. Mango trees are found in many yards.

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This cool clock tower is near the traffic circle.  I haven’t had much luck finding the name of the church or it’s history.  I did find that this tower overlooks the Juan Pablo II school.

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Apparently the locals believe it’s good luck to stroke blonde hair.  The girls were targeted with their goldie locks.  This nice man worked directing traffic near the central market as well as answering questions and giving directions to tourists.

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Most, many, not quite all the buildings look like they are ready to build a top floor, but abandoned the project. We’ve been told the real reason is that taxes are paid upon completion of the building, but if they never finish the project, they don’t have to pay the taxes. This area has all types of uses.  We saw that some houses use it as a patio or a place to hang the laundry.

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The police are everywhere, not one or two, but a whole bunch of them with combat uniforms and major artillery. It’s hard to get used to their presence, but these guys were friendly enough to wave and smile.

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Flowers grow everywhere especially bougainvillea which thrives like a weed.

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The artisan market stretches several blocks.  The booths are loaded with trinkets, blankets, t-shirts, jewelry, carvings, and anything that might catch a tourist’s eye.  We supported the local economy and everyone walked away with something shiny.  We got jewelry, a magnet, a mirror, a fish mobile, stone chess board, and a plaque with for Makai made out of license plates. Can’t live without any of it!

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Like my necklace?

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Now that we know where the Municipal Mercado is we’re off seeking lunch.

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Oh yes, just as I remember.  The produce is much more beautiful at this market than the supermarket. I couldn’t believe how wilted, over ripe, and bruised the produce was at the supermarket, this is more like it.

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The market is divided up into sections.  The meat section wasn’t exactly as appetizing as the produce.

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Everything was clean and iced in the fish market.

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How about lunch. The waterfront offers several open air restaurants, but nothing is like street tacos.  The first place we sampled was on an empty lot on a busy street corner.  They had a little shade, a cooler of cold drinks, a lady pressing tortillas, and a guy grilling and chopping steak for tacos. The choices were bistek or al pastor. Bistek is simply chopped steak, but the girls were sold on the al pastor.  This is marinated pork on a vertical spit with pineapple.  Oh, yea! We’re eating in Mexico now!

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The plates are covered in plastic for easy dish washing.  We each ordered two tacos and then they were so tasty, everyone wanted uno mas por favor. We ate something like 15 tacos and 5 cokes, plus a side of rice and beans, everyone was full and happy.  The bill made us even happier.  $12 how can you beat that.

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The next day’s lunch was at the municipal mercardo.  I was looking for Carnitas and we found it.  This yummy roast pork is served on a fresh tortilla with a tray of fixings. You know, cheese is not typically a taco condiment.  Marie refused to eat, she just couldn’t handle walking past the chicken heads draped over the counter or big piles of fish and then eat lunch.  The rest of us enjoyed everything and once again, the bill was $12.

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Today’s lunch was at Tamale Any, a place Eric remembered from the t-shirt he bought here many years ago.  This time we had a huge spread at this beautiful restaurant.

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Everyone had tacos or tamales but I was torn between tortilla soup and pozole. Pozole is a stew of meat and hominy served with a tray of condiments like onions, cheese, avocado, radish, etc. Today I went for the Tortilla soup which is a pepper broth over chicken and cheese, tortilla chips and served with a tray of condiments as well. This place is much fancier, more food, two drinks for each of us, left overs for snacks later and the bill was $40.

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After lunch each day we would get heated up on the walk back to the beach.  Better cool off in the shade with some ice cream. Even though we’re full, we’re not done eating Mexican food.  Comida de Mexico es muy bien!

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Critters are everywhere.  Walking along the canal we saw a large iguana scurry by.  There are plenty of dogs laying around.  I was pleased that they all looked healthy and well fed.  This is surely a dog’s life.  No collar, no neutering, plenty of snacks around the restaurants and shade to sleep the day away.

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Cats must hide, because we don’t see too many.  This one smelled our left overs and followed us around for awhile

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How about the Chihuahua.  This one looks a bit nervous, but then I guess they all do.

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Now everyone wants a bird.  I keep saying we already have a pet, but the kids think another one is in order.

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To relax and cool off after town we go to the beach.  This is the very beach our pal Mike rented a hobie wave, maybe this one, when he visited us all those years ago.  After we all had such a good time, he went home and found one for us to share.  All that Hobie sailing prompted us to find the Hobie wave the Makai carries around.  We sailed our Hobie around the bay to blend in with the tourists.

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A nice swell rolls in the bay creating waves on the soft beach.  The girls played in the waves with and without boogie boards. We managed to get sand in our hair, bathing suit, and anywhere else it could find to hide. My favorite way to get rid of this sand is to swim back out to Makai.  Yesterday on my swim back a school of small fish came jumping by and one hit me in the chin.  It was nuts, I got hit by a fish and had a very tiny but very bloody wound that wouldn’t stop.  Marie put a band aid on it and then everyone chuckled at me.

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It’s nice to be on the beach again, but we haven’t found one that compares to the Bahamas beaches.  There we could go for miles on white sand and clear water and never see another person.  Here the sand is darker, the water is cloudy and we have to share with tourists.  I guess we’re ruined.

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One more passage

This is our last big passage to get us to the Mexican cruising grounds Eric and I visited with Teak on our Old Makai 17 years ago.   Here we go, 500nm+ and 5 nights.

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Mexico is serious about their homeland security.  Now that we’re officially checked into the country and have a temporary import permit for Makai we only have to check in and out with the Port Captain in each town.  The day we were to leave, the Navy and Port Captain arrived with armed guards and a search dog. Topaz wasn’t so happy about the working dog sniffing around on her boat, so we went for a walk.

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In the Atlantic the wind came out of the north in the fall and winter, propelling us into warmer cruising grounds, and out of the South in the spring and summer pushing us back to the Chesapeake Bay.  When it wasn’t blowing out of the north or south, we could get good wind out of the east.  This wind was predictable, steady and would switch often enough we could wait for the next wind shift to take us where we want to go.

In the Pacific our wind choices are too much out of the north, not enough out of the north or too much around a cape or in the gulf of Papagayo or Tehuantepec.  We’ve been very lucky that our timing has been coinciding with the weather nicely.  Today we’re ready to leave and the Gulf Of Tehuantepec has calmed down from a nasty 30+kts of wind to zero.  The safe path across this bay is to hug the beach in case the wind comes up, but the marina manager said with the long windless weather window we should have no problem motoring straight across the bay.  All that motoring requires diesel and lots of it.  With no fuel dock, the marina loaned Eric oil jugs and gave him a ride to the gas station.

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Finally, by evening we set off.  All morning long the land heats up and the air above it rises sucking in a breeze from the ocean in the evening, so we get to start the passage with a little sail.  We noticed that as soon as the big orange ball in the sky dips below the water, the wind stops and we have to motor until the next afternoon.

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We saw plenty of life crossing the Gulf of Tehuantepec.  The water was glassy smooth with occasional disturbances from flocks of birds, schools of bait fish and scattered turtle shells.  At first we were nervous about floating obstacles but then realized that the sleeping turtles would wake up when Makai is right upon them so they can swim out of the way.

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After crossing the gulf there was the added complication of fishermen.  They would string long floating nets on the water and spend the day tending them.  It’s hard to avoid running over the net because is snakes around on the surface for quite a distance and we’ve been unable to figure out where it begins and where it ends.  These fishermen called us over so they could push the net down for us to go over it.  Unfortunately, we still grabbed a piece with our outside rudder.  Eric had the engine in neutral the whole time so the fishermen just needed to push the line down to free it.   Another ponga we met on the trip waved and asked for water.  We filled their jug with cold water but declined the little tuna they offered in return.

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We had more dolphins visit us in one day than the whole time in the Atlantic.  Several times a day 5-10 dolphins would come jumping, splashing and speeding up to Makai’s bow.  One night I saw them come with glowing trails of phosphorescence.

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Topaz always alerts us when her friends come to visit. She goes from her Topaz dream land to full on alert mode.  Woof Woof Woof, in a high pitched alarm voice.  Scrambling and skidding as she races them to the bow.  How does she know they’re here if she’s sleeping?  You can smell them.  We’re used to sailing around deserted islands, but here on the mainland of Central America, you can really pick out smells. The dolphins smell like fish, reminds me of the smell when Roy is cleaning his catch out back.  On land they also burn trash and brush. One day Roy and I noticed that it smelled like vanilla.  This is crazy because we’re usually several miles off shore but can still enjoy the smell of burning refuse.

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Eric thinks the dolphins hang out extra long because they’re interested in Topaz.  When she’s tied off in the cockpit and can’t go all the way up front, dolphins often swim along the back of the boat while she barks her furry little head off.

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This passage has been quite uneventful.  In the evening after 18 hours of motoring we would often change course a bit and sail for a few hours.  This always resulted in tacking up wind. The current was against us the whole way and if the evening wind blew hard enough we could barely make 4kts with the engines.

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The days were spent cooking and eating, sleeping and reading, and of course searching through our extensive movie library.  In the morning we would all compare notes on what movies were watched looking for recommendations.  It’s hard to select a good movie when all you have is a title and possibly a recommendation from the crew.  I watched the first 10 minutes of dozens of movies.  Many had too much violence, too much sex, were too boring, or I had already seen before.  I was surprised at how many movies I watched that starred famous actors and I had never heard of.

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You have to feel sorry for Topaz.  Of all those fun activities we all enjoyed, she only had eating, sleeping, barking and getting schmoogled on ( that is pets, hugs, scratches, cuddles, & sweet talk).  Passages like this are very relaxing and give us a chance to relax.

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Passage to Mexico

While our stay in Golfito, Costa Rica was short, we had fun visiting with Tim and Kate, the owners, and all the other cruisers who came through the anchorage.  The upstairs is the cruisers lounge with a cool patio, shower and bathroom, TV, and honor system refrigerator, and walls decorated by boaters passing through.

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We recognized a few acquaintances from the last time we cruised in Mexico, so Genny was tasked with adding Makai to the wall.

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Roy lowered the Costa Rican courtesy flag.  We fly a similar flag for each country we visit. A quick stop at the fuel dock and off we go.  The passage is well over 600 nm, should take 5 days and pass by Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala and then enter Mexico.  Except for the Gulf of Papagayo, there isn’t much wind predicted so we’ll be using the engine quite a bit.

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Our first 24 hours was motoring along on glassy water. Roy put out a fishing line, it’s always exciting to hear the zing of the reel when a fish takes off with the lure.  Today when the reel sounded off everyone sprang into action.  I was sitting on the back step giving Topaz a hair cut so all I could do was yell, “Fish ON!”, the line was going fast, Eric stopped the boat, and that’s when we saw it.  A huge Marlin was out at the end of the line.  Leaping into the air, thrashing about and taking more line.  Roy knew we were unprepared for this guy and then started calling for scissors to cut the line.  It all happened so fast there was nothing we could do except stare out there at this beast.  Within half a minute he took all the line and then broke it to our relief.  Roy reeled in what line he had left and assessed the damage to the reel while the fish was still out there jumping. The guys found one broken part and one adjustment to make.  Some new line and the replacement part and we’ll be back in business.

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We finished up Topaz’s haircut, both of us get all hairy and itchy, we’ll have to swim next.  I bought these clippers many years ago to trim Teak while we were cruising in 1997 and 1999.  Each year I get new blades, my favorite is size 3F, and Topaz his styling in her tropical brush cut.

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Turning off the engines left us stopped in the water and ready for a dip.  The water around Golfito was really mucky and it’s been awhile since we swam in clean fresh water so this was fun.  Marie wasn’t taking any chances with this offshore dip, she has her life vest, fins, goggles and a float.  Topaz loved it, she’s been hot and dry for weeks, too bad we have to start up the motor and press on.

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Marie saved a few buckets of fresh water for her cockpit bath.  Very refreshing since it has been so steaming hot lately.

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The gulf of Papagayo is one of the crossings we had to watch the weather for.  The timing worked out nicely where we started to cross at daybreak and finished at sunset.  Yes, there was a lot of wind and choppy seas, but all reefed down Makai was happy to race across the gulf at a comfortable 7-8 knots.  The challenge was that it was gusty at times.  The wind would die down and we would have to put on the motor.  Within a half hour the motor would go off, the jib would come out, then the wind would increase and prompt us to roll the jib in half way then the cycle would start again. Once on the other side we saw plenty of shrimp boats.

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Even though the wind was light we had good sailing from 1 pm to sunset.  As the land heats up, the air heats and rises leaving a space to fill with new air from the ocean.  I think of it as the land is inhaling and giving us a free ride.

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With five days to do nothing but read and nap, the boredom starts to set in and we start to do chores.  Last summer I made a new cover for the mainsail with straps to gather the sail when we lower it.  These lazy jacks can have quite a load on them with our heavy mainsail.  I’m not sure if I didn’t reinforce the areas with the most load properly or if my thread is too light but most of the straps that tie off to the lazy jacks were tearing away from the stack pack.  While on watch I sat there and looked at the repair job and thought about wrestling with the main sail in the hot marina to get the cover off for repairs.  With the sail up, this looked a lot easier, so with no excuses why I can’t sew underway, we took it off and made the repairs.   What a relief, that job is done.

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We saw many turtles resting on the surface, dolphins came to play in our bow wake and these birds circled Makai for hours.  They would swoop in and bicker among themselves. When they landed, they walked really funny on their bellies. Maybe it’s nice to have guests, but these guests aren’t potty trained so we set Topaz off to clear the decks.

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Just before arriving at the Marina entrance in Mexico we had a bee problem.  First there was one or two, then there was a swarm.  Hundreds of bees swarming around the radar and the helm.  Topaz and the kids ran inside and closed up all the hatches while Eric got our salt water hose out and blasted them.  In the past we’ve been attacked by Love Bugs in Florida and Flies in Delaware, but nothing that will hurt us. Eric and I each got one small sting, but luckily Makai got rid of the bees. We remembered experiencing these Africanized agressive bees from last time we cruised in Mexico.

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Finally we arrived in Marina Chiapas, tied up, cleaned up and got a full night sleep.

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I scrubbed all the foot prints from people boarding at the Panama Canal, dirt and ash from Costa Rica, and salt from the passage off of poor Makai, then buffed and waxed the starboard hull.  The kids are doing school work and Eric is working to keep up with our spending.

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Our friend who spent many years cruising in Mexico sent us an envelope of pesos last summer.  We’ve been waiting patiently to arrive so he can buy us our first ice cream and beer treat.

The neighbors have been directing us to the nearest shopping plaza, so we packed up and walked up to the street and waited for the bus.  There aren’t any bus stops or schedules, just wait for the next one to come by.  First a taxi came sailing down the street, flashed his lights and kept going. That must be the signal, so when a mini bus came by and did the same we flagged it down. The bus was very nice, more like a 15 person van. We experienced these buses in other places where there is a driver and a conductor who loads and unloads passengers filling every nook and cranny and collects the fare. When the seats were full we thought it was going to be an express bus to the market. HA! They picked up like 10 more people.  Lots of squishing and standing, even though the bus isn’t designed to stand.  There is no isle, just rows of seats.  Soon enough we arrived at our destination, Walmart.  We were surprised to find the plaza is actually an indoor, air-conditioned mall.  There were a few clothes stores and gift shops, but also a high percentage of the stores sold shoes.  Not just sneakers and such, but those super high heel, platform, how do you walk in those things, style shoes.  Also, there were several barber shops.  So Roy got a haircut.  Across from the barber was a video store with a rifle carrying guard.  We later learned they are the Brinks guys with an armored car out front somewhere.

 

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It was a successful day.  Besides Roy’s haircut, Eric got a SIM card to power up our phone and data for email, we had lunch at the food court, Dominos pizza for Eric and Marie, Chinese for the rest of us, we peaked at the movie theater and considered a movie but decided we didn’t have time.  Instead we went for the main event, Walmart.  Oh, yea, Eric got a few new pairs of shorts (old ones were in tatters), Roy got head phones (old ones disintegrating), the girls got ear buds because they look cool, I got a new shirt for a treat.  Now that fruits are plentiful, we got a blender to make smoothies and margaritas and then a few groceries and that’s all we can carry.  Heading back to the curb for a bus, the taxi drivers bargained with us.  That’s the last straw, we’re now certain our Spanish totally sucks.  We’ll have to take classes when we get home and then bring Makai back to Mexico again to test out any new skills.

In the end we paid $14 for a taxi instead of $7.50 for the bus.  Marie had to sit on my lap, but we had air conditioning and the driver played loud music.  When he took curves we all squealed in the back as we squished from side to side.  We also noticed that the lines on the road seem to be more of a guideline instead of a rule because no one obeys them.  The bus and the taxi pass on double yellow lines, squeeze between on coming traffic and the guy they are passing, drive on the shoulder, all kinds of scary things. The driver kept fiddling with his phone and music, Marie said he was driving with no hands and kept drifting into the oncoming lane. In the end we survived.  Eric closed up the boat, put on the air conditioning and spent the evening doing our taxes.  I made yummy tacos and smoothies for dinner and we watched Herbie the Love Bug.

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Yesterday we spent much of the day getting our paperwork together.  The Marina manager who speaks, Spanish, English and French took us and the people from a French boat to Immigration and the Port Captain.  Ushered us around for forms and payments.  Roy made a new friend.  Gaston is 14 and has lived his whole life sailing from France to the Caribbean, Cape Horn, Alaska, via the Marquesas and Hawaii and down the coast on their way to Panama. Now we’re just about ready to leave.  We should arrive in Zihuatenajo on Sunday.
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Yahoo, we made it to Mexico!

This was a great five day passage. We had wind from every direction in a range of zero to 27 knots. We sailed past five countries with a challenging sail across Nicaragua. We passed many shrimp boats and pangas in the night. Now we’re in Chiapas Mexico checking in with the Port Captain, the Navy, Customs and immigration. I hear there is a Walmart in town so we have a list going. One more passage, hopefully we will be able to leave on Wednesday for another 5 days to Zihuatenjo . Sent from my iPhone

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